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b o w i e 7 0 s c h r o n i c l e

Young Americans

Beginning with a new hair cut - short - Young Americans the album was another success, which was classified [by Bowie himself] as plastic soul.

David found his way to work with his [legendary] idol John Lennon on 'Fame' and 'Across the Universe' for the albums final production. His collaboration with Lennon was one of the most important moments in his life at the time, however, he was also experiencing problems with drugs, and was the most sensitive person he could be….

The Personality
Still living in Los Angeles from the year before, this time with friend and associate, Ava Cherry, and usually away from Angie and her outrageous past times, David was about to heal himself of these disadvantages.
He would soon get off drugs the next year, and visit the East with Iggy Pop [Russia, Berlin, etc.]. But before that, he had more problems than ever.
While recording Young Americans, David would listen to the tracks upon completion. Fellow musicians, Paul McCarthy and his wife, as well as John Lennon, would drop by for a visit and listen to his new tracks.
One incident which defined his sensitivity was when they were listening to the tracks, and Bowie kept playing them over and over and over….
John Lennon finally said something like "Have you got any other albums?" and David ran away, furious at the comment, all in tears.
*sigh* John and David later telephoned each other, and John apologized for what he had said. Clearly, David was showing utter sensitivity towards everyone and everything.

"Plastic Soul"
David appeared on Soul Train in 1976 to promote Young Americans, and he was trying to promote himself in America. The charts were fabulous in the UK, but the US did not seem as interested.
His idea was to release an album in America, that was "American". So, here comes "Young
Americans", but not just the title said it all...the music did too. The US was into soul, so David got together some brilliant background singers, including Luther Vandross and long time friend Ava Cherry, and pulled out a great saxaphone melody for each one of the tracks. Did America like it? Well, the UK did - it was #2 on the charts.